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Planning for Success – How Can Ridge Gets Your Move Right

Planning a machine move is more than just showing up and looking at the location.

At Can Ridge, our work starts long before any equipment or machinery arrives on site. We aim to be fully prepared for the move well in advance of the day it happens. This is our way of ensuring the move goes smoothly.

Our goal is to meet our customers’ needs while maintaining a safe environment. The most important thing we can do to achieve this goal is to plan each detail of the machinery move – from the transport, rigging, and placing of the equipment to its assembly and disassembly upon arrival at its destination.

Getting the weight right

Since weight plays such a big part in the approach to a move, we aim to double and triple check weights before accepting jobs. This can pay off, like it did during a recent move. What we were told was a 50,000 pound job turned out to be a 60,000 pound one instead. How did we respond? Our crane operator shook his head, smiled, and pulled the lever up to start the move. He was able to do this because – as we do in all our moves – we had double checked the manufacturer’s specifications and were prepared for the actual load size.

Planning every detail, from start to finish

Without planning like this, small details tend to be overlooked, particularly for complex moves. And it’s the small details that are often the most important, as inexperience and poor judgement quickly become risky business for your existing or newly acquired assets.

That’s where comprehensive pre-move planning comes in. With every detail covered beforehand, we’re able to approach every move with the right equipment, experience and safe working practices to ensure success.

When 50 becomes 60

Below is a picture of Steve, a 360 customer who had the 50,000 (oops, 60,000) pound brake press that needed to be moved across his shop.

 

The real challenge in this job was moving the brake press, nicknamed Sheila, over a trench in the warehouse floor that carried electrical cables to the whole facility. We needed to move those 60,000 pounds over the trench without damaging any of the electrical circuitry.

 

With all the bases covered and a full plan in place before the move even started, we were able to get Sheila to her new home without any problems, despite the weight discrepancy. Planning the details, it seems, delivers results! And another result: Can Ridge can now add Steve, and his machine Sheila, to its growing list of satisfied customers.